Reelization

"Pick up your camera. Shoot something. No matter how small, no matter how cheesy, no matter whether your friends and your sister stars in it. Put your name on it as director. Now you're a director. Everything after that you're just negotiating your budget and your fee." ~ James Cameron

Archive for the tag “film tips”

How To Be a Better Camera Operator Part 2: TECHNIQUE

Through The Lens Film School

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Welcome to part 2 of my “How To Be A Better Camera Operator” series (if you haven’t read part 1 click here). In this post we’ll be looking at Camera Techniques – what tricks or techniques do you require, or could you improve on, to be the very best Camera Operator you can be? Read on!…

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Lighting for Film & TV – Part 2: 3 Point Lighting

More lighting tips! 3 Point Lighting-Part 2
Happy Film Making 🙂

Through The Lens Film School

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If you can light an orange so that it looks or photographs as smooth and round as a billiard ball, you are ready to light close-ups and portraits of living people.

– John Alton, Cinematographer.

So… Lighting: It’s a huge subject, but I thought I’d attack the very basics in part 2 of this series – 3 point lighting. If you haven’t read the intro to this series you can find it here.

3 Point Lighting is a common technique that can be used for both documentary AND drama. It’s the foundation of most lighting techniques and is relatively quick and easy to setup. Please keep in mind that although I make a lot of references to lighting interviews here, these techniques are perfectly transferable to lighting your lead actors in a film, musicians in a music video or products in a commercial.

I’m…

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Lighting For Film & T.V. – The Basics

A great post on ‘the basics for lighting’!
Learn the skills.
Apply to your film.
Teach others.
Happy Film Making 🙂

Through The Lens Film School

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We’ve briefly touched on some of the techniques required to become a successful camera operator in the “How to be a Better Camera Operator” series, (part 1, part 2 & part 3). This next series is going to be all about Lighting.

Why lighting? Well first and foremost we get asked about it a lot. We’ve had a lot of requests from people wanting to know more about how to light and it’s one of our most successful courses.

In the posts that follow, we’ll be discussing everything and anything to do with lighting, from the basics right up to more advanced, in depth knowledge. So let’s go!…

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Film. How can I help you?

Film Snippet

Low Budget. Low Experience.

All that matters is that you start somewhere. I did.

This is a snippet of a short film I did when I first started.

I was using a cheap camcorder, a ladder to hoist myself up into trees so I could get higher angles, a tripod-on a skateboard-on a carpet as a dolly effect, friends as actors, and a flimsy tripod.

I thought I would post a small bit of the film to show that even if you don’t have $$$ worth of film equipment, a story can still be told.

It also shows that although it may not be the best film, or the clearest storyline…you can still do it, gain experience and learn from your mistakes.

Happy film making 🙂

A Note To Aspiring Film-Makers

Hey all you aspiring film-makers!
I found an awesome post that gives great advice on STORYBOARDS!
This is a MUST if you are making a film…plan plan and plan!!!
Just as you need the ingredients to make a cake…you need a story to make a film. 😀

Daniel Feidal Photography

An update on my upcoming short-film: Read the previous blog post.
One thing I have learned the hard way while shooting the short film is the real importance of having a storyboard when shooting, for all the scenes, at all times.
The script is important, but when working as a director or DP you really need those simple sketches to guide your through your shots.
One thing I found helpful is to visit your location beforehand, bring your camera and photograph the angles you want to get in your film.

You can then use these photos to do character blocking in your imaging software, and use these in your storyboard.

Don’t waste time drawing complicated and detailed scenes. Just get the image in your head down on paper.

Ok, so you shot your film without a storyboard. You found out that you missed a scene or two, or an important…

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